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High Tech Youth


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High Tech Youth


 
 

THE HIGH TECH YOUTH NETWORK IS A PIONEERING LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY OF CLOSELY AFFILIATED HIGH TECH YOUTH STUDIOS AND PEOPLE THAT SUPPORT EACH OTHER, YOUNG PEOPLE AND UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES ACROSS THE OCEANIA REGION.

 

The Network has four core objectives, these are:

    • To empower young people and communities to become more capable, creative, and confident life long learners.
    • To foster the growth of a learning community, through the sharing of ideas and support.
    • To encourage in young people the development of a positive identity and belief in their potential, through linking cultural knowledge and values with technology.
    • To champion, support, manage, research and implement services and projects that will further the above objectives within New Zealand and the Pacific

 

 
 
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Our Programmes


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Our Programmes


 
 

High Tech Youth Network

The High Tech Youth Network is grounded in core cultural values that are under-pinned in strong relationships of trust, sharing, friendship and guardianship. The starting point of becoming part of the network is the unique expression of these values, as seen in respective communities; the Network is deeply privileged to be invited by communities and people across the region to co-create together, and welcome hearing from those interested in this mission.

 

High Tech Youth Studios

High Tech Youth Studios are run across New Zealand and the Pacific. The strength of the Staff and volunteers is enhanced by their connection to each other and via the programmes run in these studios. Each studio is a reflection of the community which it serves, and while no two High Tech Youth Studios look alike, they all share the characteristics of highly engaged and creative youth, doing amazing things along side positive and encouraging adults. Find your local Studio Here

 

High Tech Youth Academy

The program:

  • Is delivered in a blended medium with one on one, small group and whole group activities using practical, real world and cultural models.
  • Is delivered in a modular way linking elements of creative design, modelling, innovation theory, social enterprise and practical fieldwork and internships.
  • Focuses on current and future technology concepts in hardware, software and creative fields.
  • Link learners to opportunities within high technology driven industries. Credential learners with high tech industry qualifications
  • Build learners confidence, connection and skills in the technology industries

High Tech Youth Tech Shed

The High Tech Youth Network TECH SHED draws on the current trend of the “maker movement” that extends DIY culture through the use of technology.  This is something that indigenous cultures the world over have done for millennia: from the pyramid building technologies if the Egyptians, to the wall building technology of the Qin dynasty and seafaring technologies of polynesian societies to name a few.

In the 21st Century, technology has provided access to knowledge for the masses. The ability to synthesize that knowledge into social and commercial enterprises that sustain and provide economically for individuals, families and communities is at the heart of the High Tech Youth Network TECH SHED.

High Tech Youth Te Rongo Haeata Research Centre

The Te Rongo Haeata Centre for Community Informatics Research is established to shine an authentic ‘informative beam of light’ on our Māori and Pasifika youth members, their families and wider community, to tell their own stories, in their own words, and from their point of view. In doing so this research will bring together indigenous research paradigms with the contemporary field of community informatics.

Te Rongo Haeata is a collaboration between Te Whare Wananga or Awanuiarangi, and Kia Aroha College

Our Impact


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Our Impact


HTYN is in affect an epistemic (knowledge) community that aims to promote life long learning in young people. We aim to see young people being highly resilient, having a sense of belonging (Cultural identity) and can think creatively (Meta cognitive skills – i.e. they are forward thinking and planning for their futures and those that they care for).

HTYN mediates between both informal learning environments (such as our after school HTY Studios) and formal learning environments (such as the HTY Academy). How ever central to both is project-based learning that is centred on the passions and interests of both the young person and their peers.

HTYN operates a Network wide online portal that hosts all the young persons projects, and tracks the developmental outcomes of each young person through personal development plans (PDP). These represent the digital portfolio of work for youth, from when they first enter a Studio, and contains formative assessment information  (such as mentor and peer review) and meta-data (information) around how each project is created, who collaborated on it, what specific software and technologies were used etc.

This “big data” is paired against an annual self-assessment of each HTY youth, that longitudinally (for the whole life of their attendance at a Studio) indicates how the Studio impacts their sense of belonging and levels of creativity.

HTYN believe that if young people have a strong sense of belonging and are highly creative then these attributes impact on their family, school and wider community life, so it is outcomes associated with these constructs that the Network is focused on.

Our Research


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Our Research


The Te Rongo Haeata Centre for Community Informatics Research, located on the shared campus of Kia Aroha College and Studio 274 in Otara, New Zealand, is a joint venture between the High Tech Youth Network, Kia Aroha College and the indigenous university, Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

The Te Rongo Haeata Centre sits within the Tokorau Institute for Indigenous Innovation based at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi. The purpose of the Tokorau Institute is to unlock the potential of indigenous people, their knowledge and their resources, by connecting indigenous or traditional knowledge systems with new, advanced and emerging information and communication technologies.

 

Current activities:

Community Asset Mapping Reporting

Preliminary data of Information and Communication Technology Community Map 2012 

Digital Literacy is so old school (Usmar 2012)

Other publications

Te Rongo Haeata “The Informative Beam of Light”. Exploring an authentic community informatics taxonomy from a Māori & Pacific worldview (Usmar & Milne, 2011)

Discussion Paper: The question of research on the impact of the Computer Clubhouse programme in New Zealand (Usmar & Milne, 2010)